Equine herpes virus outbreak, competition centre praised for its actions

Owners have been urged to be aware and a competition centre and livery yard praised for its actions following an equine herpes virus (EHV-1) outbreak.

Crofton Manor Equestrian Centre, Hampshire, announced via a post on its Facebook page yesterday (8 January) that positive cases of the virus had been diagnosed on the yard.

‘We must pull together’ to beat EQUINE FLU as outbreak roars on unabated

The equine flu outbreak shows no sign of abating – and the number of cases is likely to rise as the competition season continues, experts have warned.

The Animal Health Trust (AHT) is continuing to confirm cases of the virus, with 21 so far diagnosed this month, following 12 in April. Last week, 15 cases were confirmed, the second-highest number in one week since the start of this year.

Notifiable equine disease outbreak confirmed by UK’s chief veterinary officer!

Two cases of equine viral arteritis (EVA) have been confirmed in stallions in Dorset.

Defra has announced that restrictions on breeding have been put in place on the two non-thoroughbreds, who are on the same yard, to limit the risk of the disease spreading. Further investigations are ongoing.

 

New strangles vaccine to benefit horses from next year

A promising vaccine said to work “really well” against strangles is expected in 2020.

Protein-based Strangvac is due to be released in the UK next year following successful trials.

Fungi A Hidden Risk?

Warning to horse owners over equine flu

HORSE owners in North Yorkshire have been urged to be on red alert after an outbreak of equine influenza.

There have been four reported cases of horse flu in the UK since January 2, among unvaccinated horses, and Minster Veterinary Equine Clinic in York has urged owners to ensure their horses or ponies are vaccinated.

QUARANTINE IS NOT JUST FOR SICK OR NEW HORSES!

There are certain equine diseases which have a significant incubation period or carrier state. In such cases an apparently healthy horse could introduce an infection into your yard. Please be aware of horses at your yard who may have been exposed to disease whilst away from the yard for various reasons ( e.g. training, competition, breeding etc ). If a horse has been away from the yard with close contact with other horses for any reason then it is advisable to keep them in isolation and under close observation on return to the yard.

The impact of diseases such as Strangles and Equine Influenza can be devastating and several simple Bio Security measures can be put into place to help you to reduce the risk to your horses and your yard. Your Vet and the STABLEMATE by AGMA team will be happy to advise you.

QUARANTINE IS NOT JUST FOR SICK OR NEW HORSES AS HORSES WHICH HAVE LEFT THE YARD FOR ANY REASON SUCH AS TRAINING, COMPETITION OR BREEDING PURPOSES HAVE THE POTENTIAL TO BRING DISEASE BACK TO YOUR YARD.

Owners warned to look out for equine flu signs following outbreaks!

Three separate outbreaks of equine flu have been confirmed in the UK.

Horses in Essex, Cheshire and Derbyshire have been affected this month, and more outbreaks have been reported in Belgium, France and Germany.

Popular show centre cancels equine events after strangles outbreak

Hartpury Equestrian Centre has cancelled all equine events for two weeks after confirming a case of strangles at the popular venue.

The centre released the news via a post on its Facebook page on 28 September, which has been shared more than 2,300 times.

Pro vice-chancellor at Hartpury University and Hartpury College, Rosie Scott-Ward said: “Please be aware that we have a confirmed case of strangles bacterial infection at Hartpury Equestrian Centre affecting a horse.

Pay Close Attention to Nylon Halters, Leads During Post-Strangles Cleaning

A good wipe-down with sanitising agent might work well on wood, concrete, and plastic, but nylon equipment is harder to properly disinfect, researchers found.

After a strangles outbreak, it’s time to clean. But what exactly does that entail? According to Swedish researchers, a good wipe-down with disinfectant might work well on wood, concrete, and plastic. Nylon, though, appears to be a comfortable place for the disease’s causative bacteria, Streptococcus equi, to hang out. And even most warm washes and tumble dries in the washing machine won’t kill the bacteria on your nylon halters and leadlines.